Friday, October 31, 2014

Grimm-October 31st



PK-1 Principal/Director of Teaching & Learning

Sara Grimm
sgrimm@howard-winn.k12.ia.us
Twitter:  saramarleygrimm
SKYPE:  saramarleygrimm





      Happy Halloween!

It’s the season for jack-o-lanterns, costumes, and trick or treating, but if you are not interested in the “spooktacular” events or candy of the holiday there are many activities that you and your child can do to celebrate the season.

Halloween Math http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/mathchat/mathchat009.shtml Halloween is a time for math fun -- for estimating and measuring pumpkin weights and waistlines; for drawing spiders with coordinates and discovering the math woven into spider webs; for categorizing costumes; and for graphing candy counts.

My Pumpkin Story

http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/dailylp/dailylp/dailylp103.shtml
Use an online tool to create a unique pumpkin, then write a story about its special characteristics. (Grades K-5)

Pick a Pumpkin Activity http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson323.shtml Pumpkins are the ultimate October icons -- the fruit of the month, if you will. (Yes! Pumpkins are a fruit.) This month, celebrate pumpkins with these across-the-curriculum activities. Included: Art, science, language, and math activities.

Bats in the Classroom: Activities Across the Curriculum http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson031.shtml October -- the perfect time to work bats into the curriculum, to teach about some of the misconceptions often held about these interesting creatures of nature.

The MindsEye Monster Exchange Project: Monsters Made to Order! http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr168.shtml A project that will challenge your students' imaginations!

Pump Up the Curriculum With Pumpkins http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson/lesson028.shtml Jump into pumpkin facts and pumpkin lore. Try pumpkin science, pumpkin math, pumpkin writing...

Preschool
The preschoolers continued learning about fall this week. One classroom had a pumpkin that was still green. The preschoolers predicted that the pumpkin would turn orange
and used their math skills to graph how many days it would take. Other Preschoolers had fun sharing family pumpkin projects. They are now displayed in the hall for others to enjoy. What creative thinking!

Some science explorations included predicting if a tiny pumpkin and gourd would have seeds inside of them. Students charted their guesses, then later cut into them and discovered that they do have seeds and the both look very similar.

Mrs. Tieskoetter’s preschoolers took a virtual field trip to her farm. They watched a combine shell corn out of the field and unload the corn into a wagon. After the wagon was full, they observed a tractor drive the full wagon out of the field. The preschoolers were amazed by this process and decided to shell some corn off the cob at the discovery table.

Kindergarten
During the fall season students have been observing the changes in nature. They have been finding many different kinds of leaves on the playground. Yesterday, we made leaf people with a variety of leaves.   


First Grade
Practicing math facts and knowledge is essential to helping students sharpen their skills. One of the ways to practice and to make practicing more exciting is by incorporating math skills into games. Here are some students practicing their math skills using games like Penny-Nickel Exchange and High Rollers.

QR Codes for Reading
You may be asking, What is a QR Code? A QR code is a machine-readable code consisting of an array of black and white squares, typically used for storing URLs (a webpage address) or other information for reading by the camera, a smartphone, or an iPad. Some first graders have been experimenting with these and now have a new listen to reading board made of book images and QR codes!



These first graders are designing index card towers to practice and develop engineering skills.


Many of our Howard-Winn students had fun this week Skyping with @EricJamesAuthor about his book: A Halloween Scare in Iowa









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